We can now see Anti Matter – Dr Santilli

Top: A conventional Galileo telescope with convex lenses designed to observe ordinary matter-light. Bottom: The new Santilli telescope with concave lenses designed to observe antimatter-light.   Credit: Dr Santilli
Top: A conventional Galileo telescope with convex lenses designed to observe ordinary matter-light. Bottom: The new Santilli telescope with concave lenses designed to observe antimatter-light. Credit: Dr Santilli
All the current telescopes existing on Earth or in space can not detect antimatter-light because they are all based on convex lenses. Dr Santilli has created a telescope with a concave lens. Similarly, we will never see images of antimatter-light with our naked eyes because our cornea is convex, and as such, it disperses images of antimatter-light all over our retina. The only way to capture images of antimatter-light is via images on a digital or film camera. Concave Lens telescopes, called Santilli telescopes, have been tested and produced to detect antimatter galaxies, antimatter cosmic rays and antimatter asteroids.

Figure 1
Figure 1
Since matter and antimatter annihilate at contact into light, as a condition for its existence at the classical macroscopic level, antimatter must have all characteristics opposite to those of matter. For instance, matter-light has a positive index of refraction while, as a condition for its existence, antimatter-light must have a negative index of refraction (Figure 1). 

Consequently, the focusing of images of matter-light require convex lenses as occurring in the Galileo telescopes, while the focusing of images of antimatter-light requires concave lenses, as occurring in Santilli telescopes (First diagram)   Ref & Sauce: http://thunder-energies.com/index.php/ct-menu-item-18/11-articles/17-article-8 Click source link to see how the telescope aids in the detection of antimatter galaxies, detection of antimatter asteroids and detection of antimatter cosmic rays